Hello Beth

Just wanted to say hello. My fiance Guy is my Care Taker and He’s doing a wonderful job staying up my illness Sle Lupus, 27 year Survivor! Guy’s SO wonderful in helping me and he needs all the support he can, as we we go through Peritoneal Home Dialysis. This is Overwhelming for him seeing me go through this, for he knows I am A Survivor, not a dweller, But Guy Always needs to know someone is there for him when he is going through this PD thing at home. I, do not question his medical knowledge but only ask for support for he cares about me soo Deeply and he is a LOYAL mate. And their hard to come by these days lol. Please help support Guy in whatever he comes on here and needs to know or understand for he is a Smart man, he’s so supportive of me, he forgets he needs help sometimes???
Please Help
Sincerely’
Karen~

Guy here ,HI Beth, (Karen’s Care Taker)
Karen will be getting PD soon at home with the fresnius Newton Cycler. Her treatments will be givin` in our bedroom. She will be getting the nocturnal Dialysis. She will have the cath-line in her stomach.

We have 8 cats and 1 Dog… I have OCD, so I’m always cleaning it seems, but I’m worried that Karen will catch some Air-Born bacteria and will infect her Cath Line Site?

She is a firm animal lover and the cats and dog get the roam of the house. She Will Not budge on my issue with this. I know from research that during;Access/De Access, there is little to nonemovement of air at these times, [I]Asceptic procedures[/I] I know Very well, shes says that after accessing and starting the treatment, the animals SHE says goes back to the run of the house (to say). So I think she wants to allow one if not two of the animals sleep with her if they want. I tell her it's a bad Idea, cats might chew the lines or dog might jump on her at night and then she need a new line if this happens. I say the animals can see us in the morning, after we De Access. She says NO! Then I won't get dialysis if I can't have my animals with me. I am not happy with Karen's Idea about this , at the same time, I must respect her wishes, for this is what makes Karen happy, her animals. I love them too but I would rather they not be in the bedroom at all when she's getting[I] NOCTURNAL[/I] Peritoneal Dialysis! I know how to care for someone for it's in my nature and with experience and something doesn't feel right here. Please help me, [I]help Karen[/I] better and Safer? Guy
Karen~

Hi Guy,

It sounds like Karen is lucky to have a care partner as conscientious as you. If you have OCD, I’m sure that the bedroom where she plans to do dialysis is spotless, probably cleaner than most patients’ dialysis areas. Most of the time, Karen should be able to do her PD independently, but if she’s not feeling well, it is good that you’re willing to learn the step-by-step technique to use the cycler and monitor her health.

Like Karen, I’m an animal lover. As you say, it’s important that animals not be in the room for those short periods when the catheter is open while connecting and disconnecting from the cycler. Some dialysis clinics prefer that animals not be in the bedroom while the patient is using the cycler for PD. Other clinics allow patients to have their pets in their room as long as the patient doesn’t get peritonitis or any other problem that might have been related to the patient’s animals.

You express concern about an animal chewing on one of the dialysis lines. Do any of the dogs or cats have a history of chewing on cords? If any of the animals chew on things, perhaps you and Karen could figure out a way to protect the dialysis lines after the machine is set up and while dialysis is taking place. Maybe plastic or rubber cord covers like they use to hide computer wires would work. The home training nurse may have other ideas.

You say you’re concerned about an animal jumping on Karen’s lap. She should talk with her surgeon about the animals and how she and her animals interact to find out what limits there should be immediately after getting the catheter and after the catheter site has healed. I suspect she won’t want an animal jumping on her lap right away as her abdomen will probably be tender. Howver, the PD catheter is secured by being sewn in and there are PD belts that patients can wear to protect the catheter so there is very little chance that the catheter will be pulled out by having an animal get on Karen’s lap. Hopefully you and Karen will find that she has fewer limits that you expect.

[QUOTE=Beth Witten MSW ACSW;18914]Hi Guy,

It sounds like Karen is lucky to have a care partner as conscientious as you. If you have OCD, I’m sure that the bedroom where she plans to do dialysis is spotless, probably cleaner than most patients’ dialysis areas. Most of the time, Karen should be able to do her PD independently, but if she’s not feeling well, it is good that you’re willing to learn the step-by-step technique to use the cycler and monitor her health.

Like Karen, I’m an animal lover. As you say, it’s important that animals not be in the room for those short periods when the catheter is open while connecting and disconnecting from the cycler. Some dialysis clinics prefer that animals not be in the bedroom while the patient is using the cycler for PD. Other clinics allow patients to have their pets in their room as long as the patient doesn’t get peritonitis or any other problem that might have been related to the patient’s animals.

You express concern about an animal chewing on one of the dialysis lines. Do any of the dogs or cats have a history of chewing on cords? If any of the animals chew on things, perhaps you and Karen could figure out a way to protect the dialysis lines after the machine is set up and while dialysis is taking place. Maybe plastic or rubber cord covers like they use to hide computer wires would work. The home training nurse may have other ideas.

You say you’re concerned about an animal jumping on Karen’s lap. She should talk with her surgeon about the animals and how she and her animals interact to find out what limits there should be immediately after getting the catheter and after the catheter site has healed. I suspect she won’t want an animal jumping on her lap right away as her abdomen will probably be tender. Howver, the PD catheter is secured by being sewn in and there are PD belts that patients can wear to protect the catheter so there is very little chance that the catheter will be pulled out by having an animal get on Karen’s lap. Hopefully you and Karen will find that she has fewer limits that you expect.[/QUOTE]

[B]Thank you Beth for your kind and thoughtful reply. I have more thoughts but I have to go with karen to her docyors and I will surely mention my concern(s). It’s my upmost concern in life to prevent karens health from getter worse from complications that I might be able to prevent myself.
Looking forward to hearing more of your thoughts to future topics, concerns and advice.
As always thank you in advance,
Guy*

“Karen’s My Life” as well as my music career (hobby)

wrote a song for Karen called “Reason To Smile”
(i found my reason to smile)[/B]
Talk more soon,
Guy*