Dialysis Dysfunctional family

[QUOTE=jerseygirl;11418]Heather don’t assume the worse - that dialysis staff don’t want to encourage patients to compare notes. That is just not true. Dysfunctional family? I think not. Thank the government for putting the fear of God in health care providers. Imagine how stupid it feels when a patient is in the hospital and someone asks where that patient is or what’s going on and I as a health care provider says " I can’t tell you". You actually can’t assume that the patients want to be introduced to each other either. Some of them just don’t wish to be bothered and want to be alone. It is not for me, nor you, to judge that or make assumptions either way. It is purely patient preference. They are adults and choose whatever they want - I or you can’t make that decision for them. I will tell you however, the joy of walking into the patient lobby and hear the friendly banter between the patients who do compare notes, or live in the same neighborhoods and know each other’s entire family, generations back. That is cute, cute cute! Be part of the solution, not the problem.[/QUOTE

Hi

I did not want destory Pat’s thread on her subject,but I could let this go.The folks on this board have a great page.

“rant”
If you want to thank the government for the laws we have , thank your self for voteing or not voteing. We make the laws or let laws happened. When I went into a center it was like a Dysfunctional family, that came from a zoo. I wanted my own space at least have some curtains. Being stacked on top of one another was not nice, I was out of that place in five months. I’m schocked I lasted that long. If more people that worked in dialysis stood up and walk out of poor centers maybe more could get done. But even those that look the other way in poorly run centers need to feed their family.And yes I doing things. I’ve contacting as many people as I can and I try to get everything om paper or tape record. The thing I found are words are nice, but you need to have written or recorded facts to prove a case.

I just love people who think every one who works in dialysis have hearts of gold. jersygirl are you part of the problem or the solution?
bobeleanor

We need to be careful about generalizing about anyone including patients and staff. Generalizing is what starts way too many conflicts. I don’t think jerseygirl meant to upset you, but obviously you took offense at her problem/solution comment.

In the 16 years I worked in dialysis clinics, most staff members I worked with cared a lot about their patients and treated them with dignity and respect. Most of the patients I worked with were pleasant and easy to care for. I knew a few staff that were angry and depressed and should not have chosen to work in healthcare and a few patients that were angry and depressed but didn’t feel they could choose not to do dialysis. Unfortunately, people who are angry and depressed often take these feelings out on those around them.

So far as the dialysis environment, the regulations require that patients be able to be seen while they’re on dialysis. In this case, it’s important to sacrifice a little privacy for safety. If nurses cannot see all the patients under their care, a patient could have a health problem or bleed to death before anyone notices.

Dialysis facilities should have movable screens or curtains that can be drawn when patients need privacy. Examples of this would include when a patient is using a bed pan or if a nurse needs to cannulate or connect a catheter in a place that might show too much of their body. After the lines are connected, the screens should be removed. The access site must remain uncovered to assure that any bleeding would be noticed.

Screens and curtains don’t do anything to block sound. I worry about the lack of confidentiality of discussions between patients and doctors and other healthcare professionals when they’re conducted at the dialysis station. As a social worker, I would do my best to speak quietly in the treatment area and I would offer the option to talk in a private office if they or I needed to discuss a sensitive topic. Most patients discussed just about any issue with me while they were in the dialysis chair. The exception seemed to be when they had a conflict with a staff member and wanted my help to resolve it.

Patients have rights to privacy and confidentiality. Luckily for home patients, privacy is less of a problem than it is for in-center patients. Most home training areas have at least one private room where staff and patients can talk at clinic visits. Also, patients or staff can call each other on the phone or use email to avoid having others overhear what is said.

[quote=bobeleanor;11421][quote=jerseygirl;11418]Heather don’t assume the worse - that dialysis staff don’t want to encourage patients to compare notes. That is just not true. Dysfunctional family? I think not. Thank the government for putting the fear of God in health care providers. Imagine how stupid it feels when a patient is in the hospital and someone asks where that patient is or what’s going on and I as a health care provider says " I can’t tell you". You actually can’t assume that the patients want to be introduced to each other either. Some of them just don’t wish to be bothered and want to be alone. It is not for me, nor you, to judge that or make assumptions either way. It is purely patient preference. They are adults and choose whatever they want - I or you can’t make that decision for them. I will tell you however, the joy of walking into the patient lobby and hear the friendly banter between the patients who do compare notes, or live in the same neighborhoods and know each other’s entire family, generations back. That is cute, cute cute! Be part of the solution, not the problem.[/QUOTE

Hi

I did not want destory Pat’s thread on her subject,but I could let this go.The folks on this board have a great page.

“rant”
If you want to thank the government for the laws we have , thank your self for voteing or not voteing. We make the laws or let laws happened. When I went into a center it was like a Dysfunctional family, that came from a zoo. I wanted my own space at least have some curtains. Being stacked on top of one another was not nice, I was out of that place in five months. I’m schocked I lasted that long. If more people that worked in dialysis stood up and walk out of poor centers maybe more could get done. But even those that look the other way in poorly run centers need to feed their family.And yes I doing things. I’ve contacting as many people as I can and I try to get everything om paper or tape record. The thing I found are words are nice, but you need to have written or recorded facts to prove a case.

I just love people who think every one who works in dialysis have hearts of gold. jersygirl are you part of the problem or the solution?
bobeleanor[/quote]

I hope you tell people that you are recording them. Otherwise, you are part of the problem. Erich

[QUOTE=TheRiverdude;11423][quote=bobeleanor;11421]

I hope you tell people that you are recording them. Otherwise, you are part of the problem. Erich[/QUOTE]
Hi

Let me ask you something , when you get or make a phone and a voice comes and says that you are be recorded for quality assurance, do you hang up and say no I don’t to be recorded. They don’t even tell about if you want to be recorded they just do it.

But to answer your question I know the law in my state. If I had know that dialysis had such wide gap between centers , but until you see the the real story it hard to think that people are treated.*

Beth Sorry , I know that it takes all kinds even me. It just I don’t like folks who blame the govt. we are the govt. we may not like that fact but it the truth. sorry jerseygirl
bobeleanor

Whatever - I do vote - and I am part of the solution. Too much government is not always a good thing, sorry.